Archive for the '3.5' Category

The Other Woman

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

***½

It sucked!It'll be on cable.I liked it.It was good!It was awesome!! (2 People gave this 4.00 out of 5)
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TheOtherWoman

Carly Whitten (Cameron Diaz) has a fabulous life. She lives in a posh apartment in New York City, is a successful attorney, and has a new love, Mark King (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau). Unfortunately Mark is married, a fact that he conveniently “forgets” to tell Carly. When Mark cancels plans to meet Carly’s father Frank (Don Johnson), they have their first fight. Frank convinces Carly to go make up with Mark, so Carly goes to his house in Connecticut, where she meets Mark’s wife, Kate (Leslie Mann). Awkward!! Carly thinks quickly, makes up a story, and escapes as quickly as she can.

Too bad Kate plays Nancy Drew and tracks Carly down. She confronts her at her office and accuses her of being her husband’s mistress. However, since Carly doesn’t know Mark was married, she takes offense to being called a mistress and tells Kate to leave. Kate doesn’t give up easily though, and she basically forces herself into Carly’s life. Carly tells Kate she wants nothing to do with Mark anymore, but the girls form a weird kind of friendship.

Soon, Kate overhears Mark on the phone and gets suspicious. Carly swears she’s had nothing to do with Mark lately, so the duo decide to follow Mark when he leaves for his next “business trip.” There they meet Amber (Kate Upton). Amber is everything Kate and Carly aren’t – young, with perfect body, and, let’s call it, gullible. Mark told her that he was in the midst of divorcing Kate, but she knew nothing about Carly. However, once she meets Kate and Carly, it doesn’t take much to convince her to join “The Other Woman” club (see what I did there??)

So, the oddest trio of friends decide to team up and get revenge on Mark. The things they do to this man, oh my!! But Mark is no prince, and he deserves what he gets. Especially what happens at the end!!

Leslie Mann gave a fantastic performance as slightly manic Kate. She really had a lot of funny lines and played really well against Cameron Diaz, who was sparkling, as always. Kate Upton and her two jiggly breasts did their best, but acting doesn’t really seem to be her thing. She did a decent job though. Nicki Minaj played Carly’s admin assistant, and I was shocked to see her looking…well, normal!! She looked pretty, but her acting was, sadly, sub-par. Taylor Kinney as Phil, Kate’s brother, was a nice counter to douchebag Mark’s character. He was sweet and friendly to the girls, especially Carly. And playing the scumbag Mark, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau did a fine job. It was nice to see him with two hands for a change!

I know a lot of people are calling this movie sexist and stupid. Well newsflash – sometimes, it’s just plain fun to get lost in a silly movie. That’s what this was. Not every movie is an Oscar nominee. In fact, there are a lot of Oscar nominated movies that I have no desire to watch, ever. I would rather see The Other Woman again instead of some other “critically acclaimed” films.

Overall, this is a great chick flick movie, and way better than what you would find on Lifetime.

Mr. Peabody & Sherman

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014

***½

It sucked!It'll be on cable.I liked it.It was good!It was awesome!! (Give us your rating!!)
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Old friends, new tricks!

Mr. Peabody & Sherman

Swift shot: A fantastic trip through time with some old friends . . . with some new contemporary twists!  I grew up watching The Bullwinkle Show, and while I enjoyed all the different parts and characters, the “Peabody’s Improbable History” segments were my favorite.  It’s probably why I became a history major, well, that and my math skills weren’t the best.  So, I was expecting to not like this film, for fear it would (to use modern movie-critic parlance) “ruin my childhood,” like a movie could possibly do that! I was pleasantly surprised, and it should be noted Jay Ward’s daughter, Tiffany was instrumental in keeping everything in line with her father’s legacy.  I think he’d be proud.

Mr. Peabody (Ty Burrell) is the smartest dog in the world, he wields his genius like a weapon.  His son, (yes I said son) Sherman (Max Charles) loves his father, but he can’t ever seem to do the right thing, especially once school starts and he meets his first bully, Penny (Ariel Winter).  Things go from bad to worse as an incident very similar to Carnage leads Mr.Peabody to invite Penny’s folks over to dinner to smooth things over.  Of course Sherman and Penny steal the WABAC machine and get lost in time.

With a wonderfully painted tapestry of enthusiasm, the historical worlds are unique and bring together characters both famous and infamous from history.  There are too many to list in this brief review, but the history nerd in me was delighted to see Robespierre, Agamemnon, Leonardo da Vinci, and even a cameo by Einstein (see if you recognize the voice)!

The more mature nature of the conflict may be lost on younger audiences, and when the real threat of death is upon our heroes, I am not sure how very young children will react.  Still, there are plenty of classic laughs for audiences of all ages to enjoy.  This is a film about love, challenging yourself and growing, and about a dog and his boy.

 

 

 

Non-Stop

Friday, February 28th, 2014

***½

It sucked!It'll be on cable.I liked it.It was good!It was awesome!! (Give us your rating!!)
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“I’m not hijacking the plane, I’m trying to save it!”

Non-Stop

The H-Bomb:  Air Marshall Bill Marks (Liam Neeson), an edgy alcoholic with a tragic back-story, is barely keeping his shit together on an overnight flight to London when he receives text messages from an unknown sender.  After the typical “who the hell are you” question and answering is done with, the mysterious texts cut right to the chase, stating that every twenty minutes, someone on the plane will die, unless $150 million is wired into a certain account.

With over 100 people on the plane, Marks doesn’t even know where to start looking.  He notifies the pilots of what’s happening, and enlists the help of the only two people he knows he can trust, one of the flight attendants, Nancy (Michelle Dockery), and a fellow nervous flier, Jen (Julianne Moore), who was sitting next to Marks on the flight, to help him find the passenger sending the texts.  Before long, Marks realizes that it’s no hoax, as the bodies start to pile up.

Growing more frantic in his search, Marks begins to lose the trust and cooperation of the passengers, who he has been searching and questioning, while keeping them in the dark about the situation.  What’s worse, Marks learns that whoever is behind this hijacking of sorts is framing him for it.  Now, not only does Marks have to stop this invisible hijacker, he has to clear his own name, as well.

Non-Stop is the latest in the now annual line of late winter action movies to star Liam Neeson, who has reinvented himself as a kind of Steven Seagal-like ass kicker… the key difference between the two being that Neeson can actually act.  The movies Neeson has made as a late-in-life action star have ranged from pretty good (Taken) to oh-so-shitty (Taken 2).  Non-Stop, thankfully, is much closer to the former than the latter (seriously, fuck Taken 2).

Going into Non-Stop, I was expecting a kind of Die Hard on a plane type flick, like Air Force One or Executive Decision.  In actuality, it really isn’t that at all.  As directed by Jaume Collet-Serra, who helmed a previous Neeson actioner, Unknown, as well as the mucho underrated Orphan, Non-Stop is really much more of a cat-and-mouse thriller than a straight up action film, with elements of mystery and a ticking clock thrown in for good measure.

Collet-Serra keeps the pacing tight as the plot’s numerous twists and turns keep coming, constantly shifting Marks’ (and our) suspicion from one passenger to another.  He also does a nice job of cranking up the sense of paranoia, as he frequently shows Neeson’s eyes, with growing urgency and frustration, scanning the crowd of passengers.  Though, I must be honest, when he tried to shift our suspicion onto the one Arab passenger, I thought to myself, “No, too obvious.”, and spoiler alert… I was right.

That one bit of obviousness aside, however, Collet-Serra did a fine job of keeping me guessing who the culprit was, and, I might as well confess, I was surprised when the bad guy was finally revealed.  That said, I found the villain’s motives not entirely convincing.  Also, I can’t get very specific for spoiler reasons, but there’s a plot detail towards the end involving the plane’s altitude that really makes no sense when one stops to think about it.  Then again, if there’s one thing Non-Stop has going against it, it’s that a number of aspects about the story don’t make much sense, if one takes the time and effort to really (nit)pick it over.

But, for the most part, these issues come up thinking back on the movie, after it’s over.  While it’s going, we’re with it one hundred percent, and the main reason for that is Liam Neeson.  As always, he plays it with conviction, and he makes us believe, even when the things happening on screen are less than believable, which, again, in this movie’s case, is quite often.  Even though we get a big confessional monologue about halfway through the film in which Marks explains to us why he’s so screwed up, we don’t really need it, because Neeson conveys so clearly throughout the film, without dialogue, that his character is damaged goods.

Just from his facial expressions and the way he’s carries himself, we can tell he’s a broken man.  That’s a level of performance that few can muster, but Neeson just makes it look so fuckin’ easy.  As for the physical stuff, he pulls that off pretty well, too, especially for a guy over sixty.  That life or death fist fight he gets into in the lavatory… awesomely brutal.  Hollywood’s greatest mouth breather, Julianne Moore, manages to be less annoying than usual, and Corey Stoll has some fine moments as an off-duty New York cop who butts heads with Marks, but really, Neeson is the main attraction here, and for good reason, he carries the flick flawlessly.

In fact, I would say that Neeson is better than the film itself.  While Non-Stop is certainly a solidly entertaining thriller, it’s not terribly significant, nor is it really going to stick with you after it’s over.  At best, it’s a decent way to kill a couple of hours.  No more, no less.

 

 

The Monuments Men

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

***½

It sucked!It'll be on cable.I liked it.It was good!It was awesome!! (1 People gave this 3.00 out of 5)
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“What is art? It’s people’s lives.”

The Monuments Men

Swift shot: Loosely based on “The Monuments Men” by Robert M. Edsel with Bret Witter, George Clooney unveils a little known legacy of World War II as he directs an all-star cast of motley, middle-aged heroes.  Their heroism isn’t defined so much by their actions in the film, rather in their willingness to simply be there . . . to protect the very culture Hitler was trying to erase from the fabric of history.

With a deliberately slow pace and a sometimes exhaustive exposition, The Monuments Men tends to suffer in places because it has such talented actors all vying for screen time.  There are almost too many to list here, but I will.  Bill Murray, John Goodman, Matt Damon, Hugh Bonneville, Bob Balaban, Jean Dujardin, Cate Blanchett, and Clooney himself dot the film which takes the audience across Europe in every major battle on the German Front.  As the team hunts for stolen masterpieces, they learn that the Nazis are just as determined to keep the treasure of the reich.  And the Nazis aren’t the only ones looking for riches.

Explored in the film is the very notion of sacrificing a life for a painting, for a piece of marble, for a thing.  In the end, isn’t art just a collection of things left behind?  Perhaps to some, but not to the men (and women) of Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives section, known as the “Monuments Men.”

I actually saw this film surrounded by members of the Jewish Community Relations Council and the Norton Museum of Art, and as some of the more dramatic moments played out, I felt a genuine sadness engulf the theater.  I can’t say it will leave a mark on everyone, but it should serve as a reminder that an entire culture was almost wiped off the earth by a failed artist with a Napoleon complex!

 

 

The Wolverine

Monday, January 13th, 2014

***½

It sucked!It'll be on cable.I liked it.It was good!It was awesome!! (2 People gave this 4.50 out of 5)
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“You don’t want what I’ve got.”

The Wolverine

The H-Bomb: Several years after the events of X-Men: The Last Stand, Logan (Hugh Jackman), a mutant once known as Wolverine, has given up the super hero life in favor of living as a hermit in the woods, where he is haunted in his dreams by his late lady friend, Jean Grey (Famke Janssen). One night, after scuffling with some scumbags in a local bar, Logan is approached by some bug-eyed Japanese chick, Yukio (Rila Fukushima), who has been sent by a wealthy old acquaintance of his, Yashida (Hal Yamanouchi), to bring him to Japan. Once upon time, way, way back, Logan saved Yashida’s life. Now, Yashida is dying of old age, and he wishes to see his immortal friend one last time.

After some persuading, Logan agrees to go, so long as it’s just for a day (famous last words). When he visits Yoshida by his death bed, he finds out that the old man didn’t simply wish to say goodbye, he wants something from Logan… something that Logan is not ready to give. Later that night, Yoshida passes away, and the next day, at his funeral, all hell breaks loose as some mysterious goons attempt to kidnap his granddaughter, Mariko (Tao Okamoto). Tasked with acting as her guardian, Logan finds himself being hunted across Japan by Yakuza, Ninjas, a duplicitous American doctor (Svetlana Khodchenkova), and God knows who else as he tries to figure out who wants them dead and why.

As if that isn’t enough, Logan notices that when he gets injured, he doesn’t magically heal up the way he’s supposed to. He seems curiously… mortal. In order to get to the bottom of what’s happening, Logan has no choice but to confront his inner demons, dust off his adamantium claws, and once again become the Wolverine. Let the hacking and slashing begin…

To be perfectly honest, I don’t really give a damn about X-Men. I saw the first film in theaters, and it more or less shot in one ear and out the other. When X2 came out on DVD, I rented it, pretty much the same thing happened, and I never bothered with any of the X-Men films after that. I’m not at all suggesting they’re bad movies (though I hear the third one is kind of shitty), they just never hooked me in. However, I have always been intrigued by the Wolverine character, and by Hugh Jackman’s portrayal of him. He brought such charisma and such a perfect air of belligerent badass that I’ve always found him utterly compelling in the role. I was even interested in checking out X-Men Origins: Wolverine, but the overwhelmingly negative word of mouth on that one kept me away.

Now, we get Jackman’s second stab at a standalone Wolverine film, the “forget the last one, this time we got it right” movie, The Wolverine. Directed by James Mangold (Cop Land, Walk the Line, 3:10 to Yuma), this latest spin-off of the X-Men franchise is about two thirds of a damn terrific movie. Eschewing the typical comic book campiness, The Wolverine is actually structured and plotted more like a conspiracy/chase film, one that favors intrigue and characterization over bombastic action set pieces. That’s not to say there isn’t any action, because there most certainly is, plenty of it, including a fantastic fight set on top of a speeding bullet train, it’s just that the story and the characters are the driving forces here.

This, naturally, means that Jackman would have to rely on more than his physical prowess, which is itself impressive, in order to carry the picture, and he does exactly that. This is a conflicted, tormented Wolverine who’s running from his past, while trying to cope with his new found mortality, and Jackman brings his A game. This is his sixth time playing the character, and you’d think he’d be getting tired of it by now, but alas, he continues to play Logan with uncanny conviction. He is given immeasurable support by Japanese actresses Okamoto and Fukushima, both making their feature film debuts. Fukushima, in particular, is impressive as an ass kicking psychic mutant who knows her way around a Samurai blade.

Less impressive is Janssen, reprising her role from the first three X-Men movies. There’s nothing wrong with her performance, the problem is that the movie overuses her. All we needed were one, maybe two dream sequences with her, to get across that Logan feels guilty over her death. But we get scene, after scene, after scene… she pops up several times through out the film to lay the guilt trip on him, and it got really redundant really quickly. But, that’s a rather minor criticism.

A major criticism would be the film’s entire third act. As stated, the first two thirds of The Wolverine play out like an awesome, gritty thriller, even if the opening asks us to believe that one can survive a nuclear blast by hiding in a well. Then the last third happens, and all the cool grittiness and brooding character development goes right out the window. Set entirely inside a James Bond villain lair, with CGI mutant morphing and a giant, robotic Samurai straight out of Sucker Punch, The Wolverine basically turns into a big, loud, dumb comic book movie, the kind of which it spent so much time trying not to be. Add on to that a tacked on post credits scene that’s meant to set up X-Men: Future of Ass’s Past or whatever the fuck it’s called, and we’re stuck with two thirds of a great movie that totally derails in the final act. Tragic.

But, up until the 100 minute mark, The Wolverine really is one hell of an entertaining flick, with a tour-de-force showing from Jackman and a surprisingly engaging story. I liked it so much it has made me interested in checking out the older X-Men movies (and even the first Wolverine film) to see if maybe I can get into them. If you’re an X-Men fan, it’s required viewing. If you’re not, then it might just make you into one.

 

All is Lost

Monday, November 11th, 2013

***½

It sucked!It'll be on cable.I liked it.It was good!It was awesome!! (Give us your rating!!)
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All is Lost

Directed by: J.C. Chandor
Cast: Robert Redford
There is no doubt that the expression “the sea is a cruel Mistress” is one of life’s truisms. It is a harsh environment devoid of most everything man needs to survive, most importantly fresh water, one of life’s biggest ironies.

When one undertakes a journey of any distance on the open sea, he or she must carry everything needed to survive for long periods should the very worst occur. And when the environment strikes at you with all the force and misfortune it can muster, you must be smart enough, trained enough, and clever enough to outwit it and survive. I know, it’s happened to me, and I’m still here to write about it. Lucky, to be here to write about it actually.

That is the premise of Robert Redford’s latest entry into his film legacy, and performance-wise one of his best. So intense and visceral is his performance that virtually no dialogue is spoken, and yet Redford manages to make us understand him and keep our eyes glued to his every move, every gesture, and every expression. He is a work of acting art, to be studied and admired. He’s almost sure to be nominated for an Oscar.

“All is Lost” is an open-water thriller about one man’s battle for survival against the elements after his sailboat is crippled and then destroyed at sea. Unlike other similar films, like “Life Of Pi” or “The Reef”, this is a much more rich, solitary experience, a tribute to one man’s ingenuity and resilience delivered on film with astonishing depth and high quality.

Here’s the story-line:

Deep into a solo voyage in the Indian Ocean, 1700 miles of the coast of Sumatra and outside normal shipping lanes, an unnamed man (Redford) wakes to find his 39-foot yacht taking on water after a collision with a shipping container left floating on the high seas. With his power, navigation equipment and radio disabled, the man sails unknowingly into the path of a violent storm. Despite his success in patching the breached hull, his mariner’s intuition, and a strength that belies his age, the man barely survives the tempest.

In his life raft, using only a sextant and nautical maps to chart his progress, he is forced to rely on ocean currents to carry him onward in hopes of hailing a passing vessel until he faces every sailor’s nightmare, staring his own mortality in the face.

The cinematography is up close and personal, with some great scene choices made by director J.C. Chandor (Margin Call), who despite trying to keep the film moving along at a interesting pace, ultimately creates a film that at 107 minutes is too long by the end. Knock off about 15 minutes and it would have been pure cinematic gold.

My take, if you’re into sailing or boating, if you like Robert Redford at his best, or if you’d just like to see an adventure film on the high seas, this is the one for you. If not, be sure to catch the Blu-ray when it hits the shelves.

Thor: The Dark World

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

***½

It sucked!It'll be on cable.I liked it.It was good!It was awesome!! (1 People gave this 4.00 out of 5)
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Brotherly betrayal on an interplanetary scale!

Thor: The Dark World

Swift shot: Better than Thor (2011) – Marvel builds the film around the characters while managing to deliver a fun, fantastical story-line that delivers a few surprises by Game of Thrones director Alan Taylor.  Stick around for the credits . . . of course, but only die-hard movie nerds need to remain after the FINAL credit rolls.

Aceman reviewed Thor for us back in 2011, and he led with how the Thor character impacted him.  Let me piggy-back on that and let you know what Thor was like for me growing up.  I wasn’t a comic book fiend, like a lot of my friends, but vikings and Norse mythology has always fascinated me.  It’s probably a big part of why I lived in Norway for three years.  And when Marvel started getting serious about putting Thor on the big screen, and he was cast as James Kirk’s dad, Chris Hemsworth . . . I was pretty thrilled.  Thor was one of the few comic books I would borrow from my comic hoarding comrades.

It wasn’t Thor that kept me reading though, it was Loki – his mischievous antics were unpredictable, often funny, and full of personality.  When Thor (2011) made him more than just a prankster, and basically downright evil in The Avengers, I wasn’t quite as thrilled.  They made him more evil than I wanted, or at least than I remembered him from my limited comic perusals as a kid.  But, with Thor: The Dark World, the writing team redeemed this error on all accounts.

Thor: The Dark World features real personality, and not just Kat Dennings as wise-ass intern Darcy.  This time all the characters involved were given opportunities to create audience connections.  I jotted down in my notes each time someone clapped or laughed, and it was more than a handful.  A few of the scenes were more revealing than you might want, so be warned.

Loki (Tom Hiddleston) opens the dialogue of the film as he faces judgement for his crimes on Earth.  He is confined to live out his days in the dungeons of Asgard.  Meanwhile, Thor is raging a campaign on Vanaheim, making up for all the damage Loki has caused with his allegiance to the Chitauri and the release of elemental forces wreaking havoc across the universe.  Really, this was just a chance for Thor and the Warriors Three (plus Lady Sif) to show off their skills for the audience.  And, yes, ladies, for Hemsworth to take off his shirt for you.  He didn’t want Cavill to have all the fun.

But, as Thor dispatches his enemies with fervor, his celebrations are lacking, and Odin (Hopkins) tells him to stop pining over Earth girl, Jane Foster (Portman) and start enjoying life as an Asgardian and to assume the throne with Sif (Jaimie Alexander) as his queen.  Thor likes Sif, but the thought of not being with Jane is too much for him to just ignore.  But, there is an ancient darkness that creeps up.  It is this event that reunites Thor and Jane Foster.  The ancient evil becomes a part of Jane, the Aether, an element so powerful it can only be collected, as it is impossible to destroy.  But, this power is killing Jane.

The architect of this evil essence is an ancient enemy of Asgard, the dark elf king, Malekith (Chris Eccleston), who should be no stranger to Mighty Thor readers.  The art department had a lot of fun designing and deploying all of the dark elf forces and weaponry.  With all the chaos upon them, and when a dark elf commando, no, more like a Predator . . . called Kurse penetrates Asgard’s security, Loki and Thor are reunited as brothers with a single focus . . . revenge!

The story becomes fairly emotional at this point as one of the most incredible funerals I have witnessed on screen, maybe second to Darth Vader, takes place.  The Warriors Three each remind Loki that to betray Thor is to court death, as he aids his brother in their common vengeance.

The audience is treated to a climactic final battle between light and dark across all Nine Realms, and Thor and Loki face real peril in this film.  Jane is dying, Loki and Thor are reluctantly reunited, in hatred of their mutual enemy, Odin chooses an heir, and Earth is about to “go dark.”  If you are a fan of Thor, you simply can’t pass up the opportunity to watch the Asgardian in action.  My new buddy, Curtis, of 95.5 had this to say after the screening, “It was better than what I expected. Formulaic, but effective.”  I agree.  When I saw in the previews that Loki and Thor were going to align, I was having doubts, but the film did a great job removing my doubts.  Sometimes blind rage can make even a God lose himself.  See Thor: The Dark World, and you will know of whom I speak.

 

American Mary

Monday, October 7th, 2013

***½

It sucked!It'll be on cable.I liked it.It was good!It was awesome!! (1 People gave this 3.00 out of 5)
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“Wanna make five grand?”

American Mary

Swift shot: A desperate college student turns to a dark world and becomes transformed into something that even the dark fears – a woman scorned.  What makes American Mary so watchable is that you have no idea what is around the next corner.  Much like Mary (Katharine “Ginger Snaps” Isabelle) herself, you find yourself daring to go on.  Be warned . . . you may be scarred by this film.  The old adage of what has been seen cannot be unseen comes to mind.  

Jen and Sylvia Soska wrote, directed, and starred in, American Mary, and their twisted story follows a struggling med school student who needs some help paying her bills.  She happens on a site looking for a leather entertainment worker, no sex, just jiggle work, and her life becomes immediately unrecognizable.

At the club, she meets Billy Barker (Antonio Cupo) who is willing to hire her, but he finds out she is in school to be a surgeon . . . a slasher.  Tonight, he is short one, and tells her she can make five grand if she’ll help him attend to one of his guests.  With mounting school debt, and a professor, Dr. Grant (David Lovgren), who tolerates zero bullshit excuses, she seems trapped to say yes.  But, no, there is something hidden in Mary that she would never admit to her Nana (who serves as the only truly sympathetic character of the film).  Mary wants to see what’s beyond the normal.

From that moment on, her life is never the same.  And when wind of what she has done reaches the body modification community, she is again offered a job as a slasher.  Here is where the film really started freaking me out, as I had no experience with this whole world.  I had heard of a few people scarring themselves and getting extreme piercings and the like, but nothing to this degree.  When you first meet Beatress Johnson (Tristan Risk) and Ruby Realgirl (Paula Lindberg) it’s a bit jarring.  Beatress looks a little too much like a certain cartoon sex symbol from yesteryear, and Ruby wants to become as close to a real doll as possible.  Mary is a bit reluctant, at first, to even meet with them both.  Again, the money, and the thrill, prove too great to refuse.

Mary learns about the true nature of the dark, that it hides best in the light, as she is deceived by someone she used to respect.  The deception transforms Mary, psychologically, as much as her blade modifications changed her clients/patients.  After the darkness takes over her, and after the one thing keeping her grounded in reality is lost, Mary becomes a bloody visage of her former self.  There is no body mutilation she won’t perform, and she even keeps a little diary, of sorts, to sharpen her skills.

With an increasing crescendo of apathy, Mary becomes a perfect nightmare.  American Mary deserves a place in horror-iconography as a woman you most definitely should never cross.  The classical music sutures everything together nicely to give the film a sense of foreboding and dread.

I caught this one on Netflix, and I sure hope it is available for you to view for Halloween, because it really is worth a watch.  Some of the romantic tension was wasted on me, but I am not about to start slashing this film by Jen and Sylvia, who make a disturbing cameo.  I think their bite would leave a mark I couldn’t easily forget.  And, Mary makes Liz Salander look like Hello Kitty!

Rush

Saturday, September 28th, 2013

Rush

Click the image for more photos & behind the scenes footage of Ron Howard!

Alyn Darnay gave it 3.5 and Amadarwin gave it 4.5 stars, read both reviews below:

Alyn's take Amadarwin's take